Friday, November 9, 2012

I Will Remember

One of the best things about my Cheapskate two country European Vacation was that it turned into four countries. Double the fun!

Anyway, we went to Luxembourg for two days and it was wonderful.  Very chic and civilized as well.  No shops open on Sundays!  Since we were there on a Sunday we decided to take a drive.  One of our stops was a war cemetery. This was for American soldiers. The Americans liberated Luxembourg after the Second World War.

To say it was moving can hardly do justice to the way it made me feel.





It was so quiet and peaceful and holy.





I loved the Jewish markers with the stones placed on them from visitors. Maybe family from America.





There were crosses as far as the eye could see.  All made from the most beautiful pure white marble. I just kept repeating In Flanders Fields over and over in my head.




There was also a lovely memorial that had a tiny chapel inside.

Above is the ceiling in the chapel.












This is the gatehouse.  The whole cemetery was immaculate.


I have always wanted to visit a war memorial in Europe and I never thought I would.  I'm so glad I did.  I had an uncle who served in the war and when he came home he would never talk about it.  I just cannot imagine what these people went through but I was so glad I could pay tribute to them in my small way.



Always remember.  Never forget.





16 comments:

Anonymous said...

My grandfather was in the war too and he would never talk about it either. He only brought out his medals and journals shortly before he died at 94.

The ceiling in that chapel is gorgeous. So glad you were able to visit.
~FringeGirl

the domestic fringe said...

Sorry. Don't know how my comment ended up as "Anonymous". Wasn't trying to be mysterious or anything. ;-)
~FringeGirl

Makeminemidcentury said...

War is a tragedy that should never happen. To look at that cemetary and imagine what was happening there almost 100 years ago brings tears to my eyes.

I read Flander Fields yesterday over-and-over. Such a beautiful and simple poem.

I'd lie in front of a truck before I'd let my sons or daughters go to war. I couldn't stand the thought of them not coming home.xo

Patricia said...

My grandfather was in Flanders in WW1 and we only found his medals this year. Three years ago we did a little daytrip across to Belgium from England and visited Ypres and some war cemeteries - a very moving a profound experience, as you found too. Lest we forget.

elegancemaison said...

Those Allied cemeteries in Europe are so beautiful. Also wonderful, and very emotional. I have seen so many of them in travels through Northern France. British, American and German (black crosses so very sad).

So many young men slain from both sides. War - what is it for?

I was young in the 1960s, " Where have all the young men gone, gone to flowers everyone." An anti-Vietnam ballad but so evocative of the two World Wars and the flowers by which we remember the fallen.

My grandfather and father fought in those wars to end all wars (what hope). I have also posted about Remembrance Sunday on my blog.

Nice to see you back, btw!

annie said...

It is the sheer magnitude of those places that moved me most. that each of those markers represents a young life, a mother's son is heart breaking. Such waste and sadness.
Luxembourg was one of my first European visits. It is so small and tidy and fairytale especially for a girl originally from the Australian outback. I was breathless!

annie said...

It is the sheer magnitude of those places that moved me most. that each of those markers represents a young life, a mother's son is heart breaking. Such waste and sadness.
Luxembourg was one of my first European visits. It is so small and tidy and fairytale especially for a girl originally from the Australian outback. I was breathless!

Razmataz said...

There is something gut wrenching about those rows of white crosses. They give me goosebumps. Sad and beautiful at the same time.

Linda @ Itsy Bits And Pieces said...

So many lives lost...your photos impart the feelings of quiet peacefulness you wrote of...

WrathofDawn said...

My great-uncle served in the Canadian Army during WWI and was killed in the Battle of Canal-du-Nord is buried in the British Cemetary in Marquion, France. My dad was in the Royal Canadian Navy for the duration of WWII. He talked about it, but he only told the good or funny stories. He was such a gentle man. It's hard to imagine him in a war.

Anna Bartlett said...

Gorgeous and touching, Deb.

Anna Bartlett said...

Gorgeous and touching, Deb.

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Leslie said...

Wow Deb.. what an amazing journey!!! Have a great weekend.

Bobbi Arbore said...

there is an american cemetary like this in Florence too. I used to walk in front of it every week when I worked in Florence. It's touching. All those lost lives over the most stupid thing ever. My grandmother hid an american soldier inher basement during the war. His airplane was put down and he jumped out with the parachute just in time. He landed on my grandmothers's fields full of nazi, bur they were on the other side in that moment so my grand could take him away, cure him and fed him. He stayed there for three months then he was able to get in contact with the army. When he left he gave his parachute to my grand, because her sister was going to get married soon and needed fabric for her wedding dress. The parachute was made of silk and my grand sew the most beautiful wedding dress ever with it. It's a fascinating story isn't it? I had my grandmother telling it to me over and ove as a child.

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Jacci said...

Deb. I miss you.

:)